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Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
you wondering whether private enterprise can work, we know from walmart and katrina it works. >> walmart and budweiser, gave truckloads of water, not necessarily beer, i know you were disappointed with that. but think of katrina, $2,000 debit cards they worked out well, people went out and bought tattoos and flat screen tvs, we have the mobile homes,. neil: in the mud. >> they sold them for a deep discount, and lost about a billion in that. governor jindal from new orleans, was complaining that federal government messes it up every step of the way, how could you expect them to do well, we could do much better if you just gave us the money, that is what mitt romney says, get federal bureaucrats out. neil: when this came out today, his back up against the wall, what to you say governor? do you say no fema? what do you think he should say. >> right now, it is a very delicate time, i'm not a politician, i say fema screws it up just about every time they get hole of it since they began in carter administration, whether it is a republican or a democrat, but still screwed up, and th
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
what's happening there reminds him of katrina. gary, tell me why you believe that. >> reporter: piers, this is a city of 50,000 people right across the hudson river in new york city. yes, it does remind me of hurricane katrina because behind us, we have 50% of hoboken flooded and there are, according to the mayor, thousands of people in their apartments and homes who can't get out right now. so we actually went on a front loader with the mayor, they're using front loaders who rescue people. what's different about this than new orleans, what we saw in katrina in 2005 when we went down streets in boats, there are no casualties. that's the good news. but they're still not 100% sure. people can't leave their homes, not only because the water's deep but because there's live power lines in the water. so as we're going down the street in the front loader we see people waving from the windows, children, men, women, and most of them seem to have smiles on their faces because they have seen the water recede. in new orleans the water kept getting higher. this water is receding but people are wai
should have said with katrina. they have used the ploy and bush. hey i was told not to come in there that they didn't need the gridlock. this proves it. if you think. >> bill: let me set it up, that bloomberg told president obama and dennis miller not to come to new york. miller defied him but the president did not because the president is doing lump lomb lombado. >> in a heavily populated metropolitan area. they both start with new, new orleans or new york. the one mayor was hiding out in the penthouse trying to stay soft. >> bill: you couldn't freeze traffic zones because traffic isn't moving. >> i was 10 blocks away, billy. i gave up after 40 minutes and just walked over. >> bill: you can't go anywhere because the subways are out. >> just remember that folks when they tell you they were heartless and bush was heartless. they don't want the president in major area. good for bloomberg for saying it. >> bill: do you think that the hurricane is going to have any influence on the presidential vote next week? >> no. but i would watch west virginia. you know, they often say the
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
category 1 fool you. center terms of pressure. cat 3. same size as katrina. size of it cloud to cloud, hard to escape its grip for most of the country. just an amazing system. ÑsÑs how far will people go to relieve their sore throat? try these. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. not just a sensation, sensational relief. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- after the perfect storm. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- after the perfect storm. >> for more than 8 million people struggling in the cold and dark, life as they know it is turned upside down, but they will recover. for at least 50 people, hurricane sandy proved deadly. >> that nature is more powerful than we are. >> after a devastating blow from nature, new york city is already on the rebound. its mass transit and airports, it stores and stock exchanges coming back to life. its neighbor, new jersey, still in deep pain. >> i have met some folks there that obviously now have no place to live at the moment, and are extraordinarily emotional. a
. while we are going down the streets, it reminded me of what we experienced in 2005 with katrina. fortunately in this city, no one has died. there are no confirmed injuries. that is the good news. but it certainly looked like new orleans. what also looked like new orleans, when you looked in the windows. what we saw in the windows were children, mothers and fathers, waving at us, in most cases smiling. people on balconies waving at us. why were they smiling? what they've seen is the water receding. that's the good news, it's gone down from yesterday. the reason they can't get out of their homes is because the water not only is four or five feet deep, but there are also believed to be live power lines in the water. so it could be fatal to walk outside your house. spirits seem good but it was sure strange to see people in their windows, stuck in their homes with no power whatsoever, no heat and in some cases not a lot of food or water. we also saw people who seemed a little disoriented and confused and were trying to get out of their homes. in one case i saw two people trying to dr
following a critical disaster. he got the port of new orleans up and running after hurricane katrina in 2005. gary lagrange joins us now from new orleans. welcome to the program. it is good to see you here. if the port of new york were to make a call to you and say, look, gary, you've done this before, what should we do? what would you say to them? >> well, first, i think the port of new york, new jersey is in great hands. admiral rick larabie has weathered the storm many times before. the communications aspect is first and foremost about anything. the pilots, noaa, coast guard, army corp of engineers, all staying in touch with each other to ensure that the port and the harbor can open just as quickly as possible to assure that the safeguard and movement of commerce is first safe, but also expeditious as well. because of the magnitude of a port like new york, new jersey, just is an absolute must. a huge market area. many consumers relying on it. >> more broadly, ceos who are obviously attempting to hold businesses together and ensure that they function, many of them in a very, very difficult
a month after the storm, katrina, on the mississippi coast, speaking with the mayor of a small town down there where for a mile inland everything was rubble. he started to tell me, our problems now are mental. walking around in this, living in this, not being able to making progress, and a lot of people had severe psychological problems. is that something that is on your mind yet? >>guest: our biggest fear right now is people are going to become anxious when it comes to getting order to their lives. the longer it takes for them to get some sort of order, the more that depression will set in because this is their life. >>shepard: certainly the we are thinning about you. what do you need down there, quickly, before we go? >>guest: electricity. that will make all the difference in the word because we have, we cannot by any food, we cannot buy gasoline and we cannot heat our home. we have gas, we have good water, we need electric. we hope, we have 10 percent of the town lit up again and we are hoping they make great progress as they normally do. that is what we need. >>shepard: we are too, m
hurricane katrina days, used to run fema when katrina happened. he said this about what the president is doing. my guess is that he wants to gt ahead of it, he doesn't want to be accused of not getting on top of it, paying attention to it or playing politics in the middle of it. he went on to say thabout benghazi. what do you make of this? >> it's interesting coming from someone who has an abysmal record on handling emergencies. where i'm from, my family was evacuated, are happy that the president jumped in and moved quickly in response to this storm. we don't take too much credence from somebody with a record like mr. brown. >> thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> interesting question to have about fema. reporters throwing questions at governor romney yesterday. they were asking him a number of times -- he wouldn't state -- do you think this is problematic for the governor? >> i don't think so at all. first of all, let me just respond to jen. she just blew off the criticism about benghazi. you listen to her saying in a crisis the president hunkered down in the white house, gett
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
after hurricane katrina. >> many others have been dispatched from illinois to share what they learned from katrina several years ago. >> reporter: how much water do we need to pump out? >> our estimates at this point in time are 300 to 400 million gallons of water. and it's growing. >> reporter: and even though there's not as much overall as there was in new orleans, he says the job in new york is much more difficult. >> it's not the amount of water that's the problem, it's where it is. >> it's where it is, yeah. >> and where it is is underground in miles and miles of subway and road tunnels. >> some of those tunnels are up to 2 miles long. and the only points into them is at each end. and that requires us to have some pumping capabilities that perhaps reach 1/2 mile to a mile long. >> another problem, the age of the tunnels. new york's subway system is over 100 years old. >> some places we could probably pump out quicker, but we don't want to collapse the tunnel. >> the next challenge, where to pump all that water. >> largely mostly sea water. right now we're working on, it'll get pu
numbers for this storm are stronger than hurricane katrina back in new orleans, seven years ago. only difference is this is spread out over a much bigger area. puts the storm in perspective. everyone just stay safe. cold & cough... take s [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. honey? ...on the couch. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp
are wondering when this comes. this is barack obama's katrina moment. for gorge bush hurricane katrina was a significant turning point in undermining his aura as you say with the public because there was a mismatch between what his administration was saying and what people could see on their television sets. so for barack obama he has got to get this right, because otherwise people will see this as political disaster and another point, you know, he has got to make sure that this isn't politicized. >> jennifer: how do you do that when you are one week before an election? >> sure. i think he has done a good job of reaching out to both republican and democratic governors and mayors. george bush -- his administration provided some help to republican governors that democratic governors didn't get. new orleans wasn't included in the federal state of emergency. >> jennifer: and james do you think, first of all that the decision to halt the campaigns, for example, that is a no-brainer, right? >> yeah absolutely. and i think particularly in the case of obama talking to f
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)